So Good They Can’t Ignore You

So Good They Can’t Ignore You

Notes and Quotes

Craftsman Mindset Versus Passion Mindset

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The craftsman mindset is about what you can offer the world. It is an output-centric approach It offers clarity. It asks you to leave behind self-centered concerns about whether your job is ‘just right’, and instead put your head down and plug away at getting really damn good. No one owes you a great career; you need to earn it. Well-suited for building career capital. The craftsman mindset, with its relentless focus on what you produce, is exactly the mindset you would adopt if your goal was to acquire as much career capital as possible.

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The passion mindset is about what the world can offer you. It is how most people approach their working lives. It offers a swamp of ambiguous and unanswerable questions

Traits That Define Great Work

  • Creativity – Ira Glass, pushing the boundaries of radio, winning armfuls of awards in the process.
  • Impact – From Apple II to the iPhone, Steve Jobs has changed the way we live our lives in the digital age.
  • Control – No one tells Al Merrick when to wake up or what to wear.  He’s not expected in an office from nine to five.  Instead, his Channel Island Surfboards factory is located a block from the Santa Barbara beach, where Merrick still regularly spends time surfing.

Deliberate Practice

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Showing up and working hard will help you get better, but you will plateau. Only through deliberate practice can you become so good they can’t ignore you. It is an approach to work where you deliberately stretch your abilities beyond where you’re comfortable and then receive ruthless feedback on your performance. Musicians, athletes, and chess players know all about deliberate practice. Knowledge workers, however, do not. If you can introduce this strategy into your working life you can vault past your peers in your acquisition of career capital.

The Law of Remarkability

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For a mission-driven project to succeed, it should be remarkable in two different ways. First, it must compel people who encounter it to remark about it to others. Second, it must be launched in a venue that supports such remarking.